Friday, June 22, 2018

UIS senior honored with U.S. Department of Justice award for work on Human Trafficking Task Force

Michelle Norris, a senior communication major at the University of Illinois Springfield, was one of the many U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) employees recently honored with the Director's Award during a ceremony in Washington, D.C. on June 15, 2018.

Norris, a Springfield resident, was honored for her work as the Interim Coordinator for the Central Illinois Human Trafficking Task Force at the U.S. Attorney’s Office in the Central District of Illinois.

Norris was one of three DOJ employees from the Central District of Illinois recognized for their exceptional work in organizing and implementing the Central Illinois Human Trafficking Task Force.

“The U.S. Attorney’s Office created the task force to bring together law enforcement, prosecutors, victim service providers, and other stakeholders to better identify victims, provide quality services, and effectively investigate and prosecute human trafficking cases,” said Norris.

Norris began working at the U.S. Attorney’s Office two years ago as a student clerk, a position she still holds in addition to serving as the Interim Coordinator for the Human Trafficking Task Force.

As a full-time employee, she’s completed most of her UIS coursework online and through blended learning (part online and part on campus) classes. She expects to graduate from UIS in December 2018.

“UIS has played a role in helping me grow as a student and a leader by pushing me to step outside of my box,” said Norris. “There are many professors I can remember who have encouraged me to be bold and not settle.”

Thursday, June 21, 2018

Three UIS faculty members travel to Mexico to discuss research collaborations and academic exchanges

UIS faculty members Hinda Seif (left), Lucia Vazquez (second from left) and Adriana Crocker (far right) visit the University of Colima in June 2018.
Three faculty members from the University of Illinois Springfield recently traveled to Colima, Mexico to discuss research collaborations and academic exchanges with faculty at the University of Colima.

Lucia Vazquez, associate dean of the UIS College of Liberal Arts & Sciences; Adriana Crocker, professor of political science and U of I presidential fellow; and Hinda Seif, chair and associate professor of women and gender studies and sociology/anthropology, represented UIS during the early June visit.

The trip was made possible by a Discovery Partners Institute International Travel Grant aimed at building bridges with universities in Mexico and Israel.

“Faculty at University of Colima share many research interests with UIS faculty,” said Vazquez. “The administrators at the University of Colima are interested in developing collaborations with the University of Illinois Springfield including faculty and student exchanges, internships, dual degrees and co-teaching of courses.”

The UIS team also discussed possible research collaborations addressing the links between urban waste activities, agriculture, and tourism in Illinois and Mexico; gender and politics in Latin America; and increasing the transnational visibility of women in the arts in Colima and women of Mexican ancestry in the arts in Illinois.

“Given that three women faculty were selected to represent UIS, we were especially impressed by the dedication to their campus and profession, innovative teaching and research, and interest in collaboration of many women faculty who worked with us during our visit,” said Seif.

Although the University of Colima is more than twice the size of UIS, it also has many first-generation college students and is a public university focused on developing leaders to strengthen their state socially and economically.

“The University of Colima has also been working to strengthen international ties between its faculty, students, and the state of Colima,” said Seif.

During the visit, Professor Crocker was chosen to serve as keynote speaker for the University of Colima’s Model United Nations, which was held the week they visited. Crocker was invited to discuss her research on gender parity and the role of the UN and other international organizations in promoting gender equality in the world and more particularly, in Latin America.

“The hospitality of the people we met was unbounded,” said Crocker. “Academically, we had a very full agenda organized by our colleagues at the University of Colima, which was very much connected to the goals of this trip to re-energize our partnership.”

The Discovery Partners Institute (DPI) is an interdisciplinary public-private research institute located in Chicago, and is a hub of the Illinois Innovation network (IIN), a set of virtually connected clusters across the state. Led by the University of Illinois System with partners across the state, the DPI and IIN are the foundation for new partnerships and approaches that catalyze economic growth. World-class faculty, students, and companies will work side-by-side at the DPI to develop solutions, promote entrepreneurship, and empower inventors of the future.

Thursday, May 31, 2018

Three UIS Peoria Center graduate students score in the top 10 percent during a national field test

Three University of Illinois Springfield graduate students earning their Master of Business Administration (MBA) degree at the UIS Peoria Center were recently recognized by the department for their high scores during the Educational Testing Service’s (ETS) Major Field Test.

The test is used nationwide by more than 3,000 higher education programs to assess students’ knowledge in specific disciplines.

The three students, who work professionally in the Peoria-area, were ranked among the top two to 10 percent of graduate business students in the United States, based on their test scores.

Students who scored highly include: Ajey Kulkarni, a commercial manager for Caterpillar, Inc.; Paul Lutinen, a director at Atlas Supply Company; and Keith Tanner, a divisional operations manager at AQS/SCSI, LLC.

The University of Illinois Springfield has offered an MBA in Peoria since 2001. Students who have completed general education and business foundation coursework can also earn a UIS bachelor’s degree in accounting or business administration in Peoria.

Classes are held at the UIS Peoria Center, located in the Illinois Central College Perley Building at 115 S.W. Adams Street in downtown Peoria. More information about the center can be found at www.uis.edu/cbam/peoria-center/.

For more information, contact Rhonda Bussell, UIS Peoria Center advisor, at 309/999-4252 or bussell.rhonda@uis.edu.

Tuesday, May 29, 2018

Leadership lived: Undergraduate student benefits from research opportunities at UIS

Senior business administration major Turner Clark says he feels fortunate for the undergraduate research opportunities he’s had at the University of Illinois Springfield.

Since the start of Spring Semester 2018, Clark has been working with Associate Professor of Management Nathan Steele and Assistant Professor of Management Sudeep Sharma to investigate “The Role of Personality Traits in Predicting Negotiation Effectiveness.”

“I think that every student benefits from the close working relationship that we have with our professors and I think that will benefit us for the rest of our lives,” he said.

Clark recently presented his research at the University of Illinois Undergraduate Research Day at the Illinois State Capitol. He also had the opportunity to present research at the National Conference on Undergraduate Research in April 2017.

“At some universities it’s really hard to get research positions, even if you’re a grad student,” he said. “Here it’s really easy to get research positions, even as an undergrad, which is extremely rewarding.”

On campus, Clark is the outgoing senator for the College of Business and Management on the Student Government Association. He’s also treasurer for the UIS Rotaract Club, an economics tutor at the UIS Learning Hub and a member of the Capital Scholars Honors Program (CAP).

“I decided to come to UIS because I really liked the campus culture,” he said. “I also very much liked the CAP Honors Program, that I saw when I visited and it was the perfect distance from home.”

Clark, who is from Belleville, Illinois, says he likes the right-sized community at UIS because it makes him feel like his leadership efforts are shaping the university.

“Being a good leader isn’t necessarily always about leading,” he said. “It’s about knowing when not to lead and understanding what your strengths are and what your strengths aren’t and I think because of the close relationship we have with the professors and our fellow students we get to know each other a lot better than we might at some other universities.”

Following graduation, Clark plans to earn his master’s degree and find a job in the business world. However, he also has a larger goal in mind.

“Ultimately, I’ve always wanted to work for the FBI, that’s a very long-term goal, I don’t know when or even if that will happen, but I would also definitely like to go to grad school somewhere,” he said.

Tuesday, May 22, 2018

UIS Visual Arts Gallery announces Allyson Packer as its summer Enos Park artist-in-residence

Allyson Packer (Photo: Lincoln Draper)
The University of Illinois Springfield Visual Arts Gallery has once again partnered with the Enos Park Residency for Visual Artists to award a funded summer residency and solo exhibition. After a successful inaugural partnership last summer, which yielded active community engagement through contemporary art, the organizations are working together again to offer this opportunity. After the review of a competitive applicant pool that represented national and international applicants, Albuquerque-based artist Allyson Packer has been awarded the opportunity.

Allyson Packer, who has recently shown work at Nahmad Projects in London and the Hyde Park Art Center in Chicago, will be in residence at the Enos Park Residency for Visual Artists from July 1 through July 28. Her exhibit at the UIS Visual Arts Gallery, “Interior Space,” will open with a reception on Thursday, July 26, from 5:30 to 8 p.m. The exhibit will run from Thursday, July 26 through Saturday, August 11. The UIS Visual Arts Gallery is open for the duration of the exhibit on Saturday afternoons from 12 to 4 p.m. or throughout the week by appointment.

Community engagement is a core consideration for the summer resident. Allyson, who holds a master of fine arts from The School of the Art Institute of Chicago and a bachelor of fine arts from the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, will work with Springfield residents directly to realize her project.

In her proposal, Packer wrote, “My exhibition, called ‘Interior Space,’ will draw on my interest in brining visibility to the unseen. I will ask people in Springfield to participate in the exhibition by loaning me one item from their attic (or garage or closet)—something that they find valuable enough to hold on to, but also do not keep on public display. These objects will then form the basis for a gallery installation.”

In addition to welcoming Allyson Packer, the Enos Park Residency for Visual Artists will welcome two additional summer residents. Artist Nick Wylie will use his time in Springfield to research Elmer Ellsworth, a close and personal friend of Abraham Lincoln who was the first Union officer killed in the Civil War while he was removing a Confederate flag. Wylie is an accomplished artist who holds a master of fine arts from the University of Illinois at Chicago and is a founder of the ACRE (Artist Cooperative Residency and Exhibitions). Enos Park will also welcome Zack Buckley, an artist, composer and student at Illinois State University. While in residence, he plans to record various types of audio from Enos Park to create a multi-channel installation. The UIS Visual Arts Gallery plans to support these projects and look for ways to present this work to the public.

For more information on becoming involved with these summer projects, or to learn about exhibition programming at UIS, please visit the UIS Visual Arts Gallery website at www.uis.edu/visualarts/gallery, or email alach3@uis.edu.

Leadership lived: UIS student Navie Fields wants to be a role model for the next generation of young men


Growing up in the Chicago-area Navie Fields says he didn’t have many male role models. Now, he’s trying to change that for the next generation of young men by volunteering and serving as president of the Black Male Collegiate Society at the University of Illinois Springfield.

Every other Friday, Fields spends an hour mentoring with his “little brother” at Springfield’s Matheny-Withrow Elementary School through the Big Brothers Big Sisters Program. They talk about school work and he teaches important life lessons, like how to tie a tie.

“It’s very big for me to be able to go and reach another young man and make sure that he knows there’s somebody out there who wants him to succeed,” he said.

Fields, a business administration major, also volunteers as a member of the Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc. Upsilon Xi Chapter where he serves as secretary. He works as a student orientation coordinator and is a member of the Necessary Steps Mentoring Program, which is designed to help first-generation college students adapt to the university environment.

“When I first came to college, I wasn’t really seeking out any leadership opportunities,” he said. “After I witnessed so much leadership, have been mentored by so many great people, I felt like it was my time to step up and do the same thing.”

Fields, who attended Evanston Township High School, plans to obtain his master’s degree following graduation from UIS and work in the human resources field.

“UIS has taught me that activity leads to success,” he said. “If you’re as active as possible on a college campus, you can navigate yourself anywhere in the world. I think that’s the biggest thing that I’ve learned here at UIS and that’s what’s pushing me to become a leader.”

Fields says he’ll take with him the lessons he’s learned at UIS, as he plans to continue to be a role model for the next generation of young men.

“I want to continue to be great, so they can be great as well,” he said.

Tuesday, May 15, 2018

Leadership lived: Recent business administration graduate comes up with “Good News Now” app to spread positivity


Miranda Mogle was already a successful small business owner when she decided, at age 30, that she wanted to complete her bachelor’s degree in business administration at the University of Illinois Springfield.

“I decided since I owned a business that I should know something about it, which eventually brought me to UIS,” she said. “I’ve been attending UIS, while running a business full-time and working part-time per diem traveling, so I’ve been able to schedule my classes around my life and work on getting my degree without putting my life on hold.”

While attending UIS, she came up with the concept for a new computer application called “Good News Now”, a news content aggregator that screens out unpleasant news stories providing consumers with only positive news.

“I’m an optimistic person, a very positive person and it is hard when you’re scrolling through your feeds or you’re on the internet or whatever you’re doing you’re bombarded with negativity, so I thought why not having something that brings positivity to me on a daily basis,” she said.

Mogle is now looking for an application developer that can help make her idea a reality.

“I’ve made a lot of connections and I feel like the professors are great resources themselves and they’ve also introduced me to people in the business work who can help me further my goals,” she said.

Mogle recently presented her business model at the University of Illinois Undergraduate Research Day at the Illinois State Capitol. She was also honored in April 2018 with an “Innovator of the Year” award during the Illinois Capital Innovation Competition Awards.

“I had to really fully think out the idea, figure out how much it would cost, if it’s even viable,” she said. “Based on that, I ended up winning, so somebody liked my idea.”

Mogle officially graduated from UIS with her bachelor’s degree in business administration on May 12, 2018. She now plans to pursue her master’s degree in nursing. She previously worked in healthcare field and would like to become a healthcare administrator.

“What made UIS special to me is that it has helped me perpetuate the path that I was already going toward,” she said. “It has made me a better business person, a better manager, a better leader and probably a better person in general.”

Friday, May 11, 2018

UIS Clinical Laboratory Science students and faculty honored with statewide awards

Several University of Illinois Springfield students and faculty were honored with statewide awards during the American Society for Clinical Laboratory Science – Illinois (ASCLS-IL) meeting held in Naperville April 18-20, 2018.

Jessica Sheffield, a senior clinical laboratory science major from Maroa, was named the ASCLS-IL Student of the Year. Sheffield recently completed her term as student forum chair and was also admitted to the state level of the Clinical Laboratory Science professional honor society, Omicron Sigma.

UIS junior Jessica Sullens, a clinical laboratory science major from Vandalia, was elected student forum chair for the 2018-2019 academic year.

UIS Assistant Professor of Clinical Laboratory Science Bill Wilson was honored for his service to the southern region. Former UIS Clinical Laboratory Science program director Paula Garrott was honored with the Lifetime Achievement Award for her contributions to the profession and ASCLS-IL.

UIS students also competed in the Student Bowl, which tested their knowledge of clinical laboratory science topics. Team members included captain Holly Chaffee of Springfield, Taylor Cooperider of Springfield, Dayana Valero of Springfield, Sam Vogel of Illiopolis and Nisha Faizal of Springfield.

ASCLS-IL is an affiliate society of the American Society for Clinical Laboratory Science (ASCLS). According to their website, “ASCLS is preeminent voice of all clinical laboratory professionals, creating a vision for the advancement of the clinical laboratory practice field, and advocating the value and the role of the profession ensuring safe, effective, efficient, equitable, and patient-centered health care.”

For more information, contact Linda McCown, UIS Clinical Laboratory Science program director, at 217/206-7550 or lmcco2@uis.edu.

UIS students finish in top 10 percent during National Cyber League regular season competitions

Three University of Illinois Springfield students finished in the top ten percent of individuals nationwide during the National Cyber League (NCL) spring 2018 regular season competitions.

UIS students competed against 3,123 individuals from colleges and universities across the United States. Team captain Austin Bransky of Marengo, Illinois finished 76th overall, Steve Berryman of Louisville, Kentucky finished 100th overall and David Tighe of Austin, Texas finished 199th overall.

Bransky, a senior information systems security major, ranked nationally in 18th place for log analysis, 7th place for scanning and reconnaissance and 21st for wireless exploitation. Berryman, a graduate computer science major, ranked nationally in 13th place for scanning and reconnaissance and 19th for wireless exploitation.

During the postseason NCL competition, held in April 2018, a team of UIS students finished in the top 25 percent of teams nationwide. The UIS team, made up of five students placed 63 out of 264 teams nationwide.

The UIS team finished in 5th place nationally in log analysis, 26th in wireless access exploitation and 45th in scanning/reconnaissance.

Students who participated in the postseason competition include Austin Bransky; Steve Berryman; David Tighe; JR Gomoll of Richmond, Illinois; and Dishant Malik of Delhi, India.

The NCL was founded in May 2011 to provide an ongoing virtual training ground for participants to develop, practice and validate their cybersecurity knowledge and skills using next-generation high-fidelity simulation environments.

The competition utilizes certified ethical hacker objectives, such as open source intelligence, traffic and log analysis and wireless security.

The NCL 2018 Spring Season was designed to develop and validate player knowledge and skills in preparation for further learning, career readiness, industry certifications and other cybersecurity competitions.

For more information, contact Brian-Thomas Rogers, UIS computer science instructor, at 217/206-8165 or broge2@uis.edu.

Tuesday, May 08, 2018

Leadership lived: International student lands full-time job thanks to UIS Graduate Public Service Internship Program


International computer science graduate student Vincent Joseph from Mumbai, India, calls his educational experience at the University of Illinois Springfield “fantabulous”.

Joseph has spent the past four semesters interning at the Office of the Illinois Auditor General where he’s been helping with state audits and learning about state and federal laws. The internship was made possible by the Graduate Public Service Internship (GPSI) Program at UIS.

“The GPSI Program is a very unique program that most universities don’t have,” he said. “It’s a phenomenal program, which enables graduate students to continue gaining their professional experience, while they complete their master’s degree.”

Supervisors at the Auditor General’s Office were so impressed by Joseph that they decided to hire him on as a full-time employee after he graduates from UIS on May 12, 2018.

As UIS, Joseph has been very involved on campus as a Student Government Association graduate student senator, vice president of the GPSI Student Association and president of University Bible Fellowship. He is the former president of the International Student Association, a STARS mentor, an executive member of the Student Organization Funding Association (SOFA) and acted in the UIS Theatre production of “Macbeth”.

“I have gotten immense opportunities, which I did not get at my undergraduate school back in India,” he said. “The best part about UIS is not only that it provides you technical opportunities to learn and grow, but it also provides platforms for you to practice your soft (life) skills.”

Joseph recommends the University of Illinois Springfield to both international and domestic students looking for a right-sized campus with an abundance of opportunities.

“I love being at UIS,” he said. “I’m both excited and a bit sad that I’ll be leaving UIS, but I’m sure I’ll stay in touch with UIS.”

Joseph, who previously worked for Accenture, a global consulting company, in India before coming to UIS plans to continue to pursue his education while working.

“My ultimate goal is to pursue my doctorate,” he said. “In the meantime, I plan to complete my full-time experience.”

Wednesday, May 02, 2018

UIS faculty members receive awards for teaching and service; tenure, promotions and sabbaticals announced

The University of Illinois Springfield held its annual Faculty Honors Reception on Tuesday, May 1, 2018. Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs and Provost Dennis Papini presided over the ceremony honoring faculty members who have been recommended for tenure and/or promotion, been awarded sabbaticals, or granted emerita/emeritus status. Four major awards – the Pearson Faculty Award, the Spencer Faculty Service Award, the Burks Oakley II Distinguished Online Teaching Award and the Faculty Excellence Award - were also presented.

The Faculty Excellence Award was given to Lan Dong, associate professor of English & modern languages. The award recognizes mid- and late-career colleagues who best exemplify the ideal of the teacher-scholar and whom the faculty recognizes as role models, based on sustained accomplishments in teaching and scholarship at UIS. The award is funded through the generosity of Wilbur and Margaret Wepner.

In her 11 years at UIS, Dong has published two monographs, three edited books, sixteen book chapters, ten journal articles, and multiple essays in refereed encyclopedias and online resources. She also has a work published in Chinese. Her reputation in Asian American scholarship is well known. She exemplifies the teacher-scholar model.

“She is an excellent and demanding teacher who maintains high academic standards and has received praise from her students,” said members of the faculty review committee. “She is an attentive teacher and always provides her students with precise and prompt feedbacks. She particularly excels at mentoring student scholarship.”

Two of her recent students have journal publications, and many others have presented their work at conferences and symposiums. Dong’s students have also been very active in the annual UIS Student Technology, Art, & Research Symposium.

In 2012, she was invited to Hong-Kong to conduct a seminar on Asian American culture. She is an active public servant in her field. She has been serving on editorial boards, reviewing essays, assessing proposals for major awards, and organizing conferences.

The Pearson Faculty Award for outstanding teaching was presented to Holly Kent, associate professor of history. The award recognizes a faculty member whose performance exemplifies UIS’ commitment to excellence in teaching and who stands among the very best teachers on campus. Such a teacher both informs and inspires students, giving them the knowledge and values with which they may become productive and enlightened citizens. The award was established by a gift from Emmet and Mary Pearson, longtime benefactors of the campus.

Kent’s teaching areas are women’s studies, history and more specifically fashion history. The review committee noted Kent’s excellence in teaching, as evidenced by student evaluations, the enthusiastic support of her peers, and her cross-disciplinary approach.

“She serves as a generous mentor to both colleagues and students,” said members of the faculty review committee. “Dr. Kent’s courses are rigorous and engaging, a result of her innovative pedagogical strategies.”

In recognition of Kent’s unique scholarship and teaching excellence she was chosen as a COPLAC representative to collaborate and develop a multi-campus, multi-disciplinary course entitled “Fashion as an Agent of Social Change Since 1900”. The review committee characterized Kent’s cumulative record of teaching excellence as embodying qualities of Leadership lived.

The Spencer Faculty Service Award was given to Ranjan Karri, associate professor of management. Honoring Robert Spencer, founding president of Sangamon State University, this award recognizes faculty who best exemplify the ideal of the “professor-citizen” through public service and service to the academic community.

Karri came to UIS in 2006 and has made significant service contributions to the university, his profession, and the wider community. At the university system level, he is currently a member of the University Senates Conference and Discovery Partners Institute Academic Executive Committee.

At UIS, Karri has been a member of and active leader on numerous campus committees. He has chaired eight UIS committees such as the campus Senate, Graduate Council, the Promotions Committee, and Sabbatical and Awards Committee.

Karri is a member of the board of directors for the International Family Enterprise Research Academy and the Midwest Academy of Management in addition to membership on the editorial boards for the Journal of Cooperative Management and the Family Business Review.

Further service to his profession includes reviewing articles for numerous journals and chairing academic conference sessions. Karri’s community service is also impressive with two highlights being the development of a reorganization plan for the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Museum and advising the strategic planning of the Lincoln Public Library.

Layne Morsch, associate professor of chemistry, was honored with the Oakley Distinguished Online Teaching Award. The award was established by Burks Oakley II, who helped launch UIS’ online programs and was also in attendance at the event The Oakley Award recognizes UIS faculty members whose performance exemplifies the institution’s commitment to excellence in online teaching.

Morsch came to UIS in 2008 and is a cutting edge innovator in his online and blended chemistry courses. His philosophy of creating an active and engaging learning environment for students is complimented by his commitment to utilizing new technology. For example, to increase his students’ digital literacy, Morsch has them create infographics to present their arguments in a visual way and public service announcement videos.

He was one of two professors asked to pilot test the newly developed ChemDraw app, a chemical structure drawing software, and he also pilot tested two chemistry learning games that allow students to physically interact with three dimensional chemical structures. Morsch utilized iPads to incorporate electronic lab notebooks that allow students to add pictures and videos from their experiments to their lab reports. He is currently using a flipped teaching style in his organic chemistry classes where students watch 140 video lectures that he created over the course of the academic year at home, and then class time is spent actively solving problems and engaging in discussions.

Morsch has disseminated what he has learned from these teaching innovations in publications and he has given numerous presentations at national conferences. In 2015, Morsch was named an Apple Distinguished Educator. In this capacity he advises Apple’s education team about the use of technology in higher education and works with colleagues across the U.S. and in Canada to implement new teaching techniques using technology. Morsch also created a public iTunes U course for the two organic chemistry classes that he teaches that currently has over 19,000 subscribers. He exemplifies UIS’ commitment to excellence in online teaching and learning.

The inaugural Harry and Deborah Berman Sabbatical Award was presented to Yona Stamatis, UIS associate professor of ethnomusicology. Stamatis will research and compile data on rebetiko music in Greece, providing a meaningful contribution to the ethnomusicology disciplines; and write the proposal and sample chapter on a book tentatively titled "Rebetiko Nation: Making Music in Crisis" for submission to an academic press. The sabbatical award will be used toward expenses in Athens, Greece.

Recommended for tenure and promotion to associate professor were Travis Bland, Public Administration; Dorine Brand, Public Health; Richard Funderburg, Public Administration; Kenneth Owen, History; Dathan Powell, Art, Music, & Theatre; Yona Stamatis, Art, Music, & Theatre; and Lucas Vespa, Computer Science.

Carol Jessup, Accountancy, was recommended for promotion to full professor. Leonard Branson, Accountancy; Ronald McNeil, Business Administration; and Ted Mims, Computer Science, were awarded emeritus status.

Sabbatical leaves have been recommended for Heather Bailey, History; Meagan Cass, English & Modern Languages; Shane Harris, Art, Music, & Theatre; Holly Kent, History; Jason Pierceson, Political Science; Dathan Powell, Art, Music, & Theatre; Yona Stamatis, Art, Music, & Theatre; and Benjamin Walsh, Management.

All promotion, tenure, sabbatical leave, and emerita/emeritus status recommendations are subject to approval by the University of Illinois Board of Trustees.

UIS Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs Clarice Ford named a Woman of Influence in Springfield

Clarice Ford, Ed.D., University of Illinois Springfield vice chancellor for student affairs, has been named one of five Security Bank Women of Influence for 2018.

Women of Influence honors local women for their contributions to the Springfield area community.

Ford has been a member of the UIS community since 2008. She has served as the executive director of the UIS Diversity Center, associate dean of students and associate vice chancellor of student services.

One of her nominator’s described her as “a passionate advocate for all students but especially for students who are first in their family to attend college, low-income students and students from underrepresented groups such as African American and Hispanic students. She has implemented many innovative initiatives at UIS to enhance retention and degree completion for at-risk students, including a successful Living-Learning program for first-generation college students called “Necessary Steps.”

Ford earned her doctorate in educational leadership and change from the Fielding Institute in Santa Barbara, California. She holds a master’s degree in religious education and theology from Lincoln Christian Seminary and a master’s degree in adult education/multi-cultural education from Antioch University. She also received her bachelor’s degree in human services from Antioch University. She is also a United States Military Veteran.

The 15th annual program is sponsored by Security Bank and the Springfield Business Journal and will be held on May 22, 2018.

Winners are selected by their peers through submitted nominations.

Monday, April 30, 2018

Leadership lived: Sophomore excels in planning major events on campus


As president of the Student Activities Committee (SAC), Ahja Howard, a sophomore accountancy and business administration major, is responsible for planning two of the biggest and longest-running student life events at the University of Illinois Springfield each year.

Planning UIS Homecoming and Springfest, a week-long competition where students face off in fun and educational games, is almost a full-time job for Howard.

“Springfest is a lot of work,” said Howard. “Springfest basically takes between 4 to 6 months to plan it. It’s really a lot of work and a lot of dedication and it’s a lot of commitment.”

Howard says she wanted to become SAC president in order to have a positive impact on the entertainment brought to campus for students.

“I love the opportunities that I have here,” she said. “I get so many opportunities every time I put myself out there.”

Outside of SAC, Howard also spends her time mentoring elementary school students in Springfield as a volunteer for the 4-H Mentoring Program. She was also recently inducted into the National Society of Leadership and Success and is a member of the Necessary Steps program, which is designed to help first-generation college students adapt to the university environment.

“I decided to come to UIS because I wanted to get away from home and I wanted to get a real campus college life,” she said. “I like the smallness of UIS, the class sizes and I like how diverse UIS is.”

The Chicago native plans to obtain a job at an accounting or business firm following graduation from UIS. She eventually wants to start a non-profit organization that would help minorities in applying for college or finding jobs after high school.

“You have to challenge yourself and know that it’s okay to fall and make mistakes,” she said. “UIS made me realize that I can do anything that I put my mind to, even the mentors and friends that I gained here helped me to understand its ok to fall, but always get back up and try again.”

Howard says she’s made many new friends at UIS and feels confident in her decision to attend the school.

“I gained so much being here,” she said. “If I could recommend a school to anyone, it would be this school. I love it.”

Wednesday, April 25, 2018

Leadership lived: UIS political science major gets an expanded world view thanks to study abroad

Growing up in the Chicago suburbs, political science major Conor McKenzie had a limited view of the world before coming to the University of Illinois Springfield.

McKenzie was among a group of UIS students who traveled to Cuba on a study abroad trip in January 2018. The students spent almost two weeks learning about the Cuban people and their culture, environmental issues, public health and gender and racial equality. The group spent most of their time in Havana, but also traveled to the southern part of the country.

“In terms of being unique, it was really amazing because there were Cubans there who wanted to talk to us and hear a lot of about America and wanted us to go home with the knowledge that Cuba wants to talk to America and Cubans have a high value for Americans,” he said.

McKenzie calls the trip a “valuable opportunity” to learn about a country that until recently has been off limits to most American tourists.

“Personally, I learned from the trip a lot about another culture,” he said.

At UIS, McKenzie was recently elected the head delegate of the Model Illinois Government team. He is also a part of the Model United Nations team, which spent a week competing against hundreds of other universities during a simulation in New York City.

“For me, it was similar to studying in Cuba,” he said. “It was about the internationality of the world and just meeting people and having a really fun connection with people from around the world and understanding how to work with them.”

During the Model UN simulation, UIS students represented the country of Zimbabwe, writing resolutions from the perspective of that country. For the second year in a row, the UIS team won the outstanding delegation award, the third time in UIS history.

“I’d never been to New York myself, so we met people from around the country at the conference, got to speak with them, got to work with them,” he said.

As a political science major, McKenzie says he chose UIS because of its “small size”, excellent professors and location in the state capital.

“There are a lot of opportunities for political science people here,” he said.

Following graduation, he plans to continue to further his education by earning a master’s degree in political science. He takes with him the leadership skills he’s learned at UIS.

“At a school, like this, at its size, you learn a lot about leadership because you have the opportunity to lead clubs, to meet professors who want to put you in positions of leadership,” he said. “I’d say it’s taught me to chase opportunities of leadership and to really strive for them because their possible at a place like this.”

Tuesday, April 24, 2018

Good as Gold awards at UIS honor more than 40 Sangamon County volunteers and businesses

The University of Illinois Springfield, Junior League of Springfield and the United Way of Central Illinois honored more than 40 local volunteers and businesses during the 10th annual Good as Gold Ceremony. The event was held on Monday, April 23, 2018, at the UIS Student Union.

The 10th Anniversary event also honored all of the past Distinguished Volunteer Award winners, in addition to honoring the founding members of the Good as Gold Committee.

Over the past nine years, the Good as Gold Ceremony has recognized more than 400 volunteers, 35 companies, and 25 outstanding local nonprofits for freely giving their time and talents to make Sangamon County a better place to live.

Distinguished Volunteer Award

Susan Hack of Springfield was honored with the 2018 Distinguished Volunteer Award. Hack has greatly contributed to the mission life of Hope Presbyterian Church, and in turn, the community. As a master gardener, she helps contribute produce to the Kumler Food Pantry, while serving in other community gardens, serving at the Farmers Market, and teaching classes for the University of Illinois Extension service.

“Volunteering means giving back to my community. I have been richly blessed. Supporting others helps build a community that is more positive and hopeful for all of us,” said Hack, whose most important aspect of volunteering is meeting so many people. “I am most enriched when working side-by-side with and for others.”

One gardener team member notes, “she embodies a busy bee – without the sting!” In addition to her service in education and fellowship to the church, she helps support St. John’s Breadline, St. John’s Living Caregivers, Hope for the Holidays, Reading is Fundamental, the Springfield Bicycle Club and others too numerous to mention.

The Bicycle Club’s Harv Koplo states, “she’s an incredibly humble and competent individual who has helped make this world a better place all her life.”

The 2018 Distinguished Volunteer finalists include Terrance Jordan, Jewel Richards and Melissa Skinner-Liberman.

UIS Star Student Award 

Hannah Warden of Beardstown, a senior majoring in business with a concentration in management and a minor in marketing, was honored with the Star Student Award for her volunteer efforts.

The Children’s Miracle Network at St. John’s Children’s Hospital is the main beneficiary of Warden’s volunteer work and she is president of Dance Marathon at UIS, which raised $10,000 for CMN over the past year.

“My time spent at St. John’s Children’s Hospital is some of my most valued time in my week,” she said. “Time spent there gives me so much joy in seeing the kids who are receiving treatment and care. I love spending time working hard to raise money for all of the kids that walk in the door at St. John’s Children’s Hospital.”

Warden has also volunteered at the St. John’s Breadline, Habitat for Humanity, Central Illinois Foodbank and Lake Springfield Christian Assembly.

Star Staff Award 

Tiffani Saunders of Chatham, a Sociology/Anthropology lecturer at the University of Illinois Springfield, was honored with the Star Staff Award for her volunteer efforts with various service activities and for advising five student groups.

She regularly volunteers for Ronald McDonald House, Hospital Sisters Mission Outreach and Make-A-Wish. During the holidays, she can be found at Festival of Trees, Mini O’Beirne Holiday Store and the Salvation Army. Finally, she is a practice partner for Girls on the Run and has facilitated group meetings for moms at Mercy Communities.

“I get a great deal of joy in knowing I can lend a hand to someone in need or make the day a little brighter for someone going through a tough time in life,” she said. “At times, just being present is enough. Most of us will experience hard times in our lives, and I’ve learned a little compassion goes a long way in giving people hope for a better tomorrow.”

Finalists for the award included Judy Jozaitis, vice president of the Workforce Development and Community Education at Lincoln Land Community College and Angela Try, UIS public information specialist.

Youth Volunteer Award

Springfield High School senior Elizabeth Gilmore was honored with the Youth Volunteer Award. Gilmore regularly volunteers at Compass for Kids, tutoring low-income and at-risk students.

“Helping others and choosing to spend time volunteering brings me so much joy, because I know I am making a difference in the students’ lives and helping them better their academic careers,” she said.

Spreading her time all over Springfield, Gilmore also helps at Camp Compass, Illinois Senior Olympics, Studio 186, Land of Lincoln Honor Flight, The Matthew Project, Springfield Art Association, Mini O’Beirne Children’s Holiday Store, Ridgely Elementary School and Sandburg Elementary School.

Gilmore says she’s learned valuable life lessons such as compassion, caring for others, patience and the importance of a smile while volunteering.

Other nominees for the award included Ahmaad Wallace and Benjamin Yoder.

Heart of Gold Community Awards 

Thirty-eight local volunteers were also honored with the Heart of Gold Award. Recipients included: JoAnne Bardwell, Anne Barnett, Sarah Beuning, Carol Bingham, Stephen A. Born, Mike Buscher, Marcus Bertrand Butler, Michelle Cripe, William Drew, Paul Duplessis, David Farrell, Maureen Follis, Ken and Lynn Gilmore, Jenica Hopkins, Julie Janssen, Michael C. Jones, Chad Lucas, Dorothy McVeigh, Rita Mehlick, Virginia Mitchell, Mary Monroe White, Bill Moran, Kristin Nisbet-White, Gayle Peterson, Fallon Rowl-Johnson, Kathy Rubinkowski, Christi Sullivan, Julie Sundquist, Gay Sybert, Mary Tuttle, Jean Vehovc, Louise Vehovc, Janel Veile, Paul Wappel, Erik Welch, Sandy Wilmot and Kathryn Wright.

Organization Agent of Service Award 

The winner of the 2018 Organization Agent of Service Award is Crime Stoppers of Sangamon and Menard Counties. Over the past 35 years, members have gathered information that has led to the arrests of hundreds of criminals, recovered hundreds of thousands of dollars in stolen property, drugs, guns and other contraband and have closed hundreds of police cases on crimes.

“We provide financial incentive for people to come forward anonymously in order to help the police catch criminals,” said Ernie Slottag, president of the board of Crime Stoppers and a member for 16 years.

Crime Stoppers tips have resulted in arrests that may not have otherwise been made. Through fundraisers in the community, Crime Stoppers has created a fund from which anonymous tipsters are paid.

The Crime Stoppers board consists of 30 individuals from Sangamon and Menard counties who work to raise funds and promote the program.

Business Honor Roll 

A total of 21 Sangamon County businesses were named to the Business Honor Roll sponsored by the UIS College of Business and Management and supported by The Greater Springfield Chamber of Commerce. The honor roll recognizes businesses that have made giving back to our community a priority.

Three businesses were listed at the top of the honor roll as Golden Distinction Winners including Gem PR & Media, President Abraham Lincoln Springfield DoubleTree Hotel and Horace Mann.

Other businesses making this year’s honor roll include AlignLife of Springfield; Ameren Illinois; BUNN; Bank of Springfield; Brandt Consolidated, Inc.; Engrained Brewery & Restaurant; Illinois REALTORS; Koch, Sylvia and Associates - Ameriprise Financial; Marine Bank; Mayfield Insurance and Financial Services, Inc.; Memorial Health System; Noodles World Kitchen; RSM US LLP; SCHEELS; Sangamon Reclaimed; Springfield Junior Blues; U.S. Bank and United Community Bank.

For more information about the awards, please visit www.uis.edu/volunteer, email volunteer@uis.edu or call 217/ 206-8448.

Monday, April 23, 2018

UIS students part of first and third place teams at Campus 1871 startup competition

A group of four University of Illinois Springfield students took part in the fifth annual Campus 1871 event, a weekend-long initiative that simulates the realities of launching and running a startup company, in Chicago April 13-15, 2018.

The event, which is held once a year, includes hands-on training, workshops, mentorship and coaching, and culminates in a pitch competition – where participants can win a temporary membership at 1871.

UIS computer science graduate students Kazim Abbot of Dennery, St. Lucia; Agney Patel of Ahmedabad, India; Behrooz Moradi of Mashhad, Iran; and Derek Coppinger of Virden, Illinois spent the weekend in Chicago attending workshops, panel discussions and engaging with established entrepreneurs while working on a realistic business model that would be pitched to a panel of judges.

The winning team featured UIS student Kazim Abbot whose team created BRIDGE, a platform that that helps immigrants and refugees with STEM backgrounds find jobs in the United States.

The third-place team featured UIS students Agney Patel and Behrooz Moradoni who worked on an application called “Better Bet”, a platform that helps you make and track fun bets and wagers with friends.

The event brought students from more than 100 Chicago-area universities together to collaborate and share ideas.

Founded in 2012, 1871 was created to support Chicago’s digital startup community. Since that time, it has become the hub for the city’s thriving technology and entrepreneurial ecosystem. Located in The Merchandise Mart, 1871 is the home of more than 400 early-stage, high-growth digital startups.

For more information, contact Blake Wood, UIS assistant director of public relations, at 217/206-6716 or bwood8@uis.edu.

Springfield resident David Farrell honored for Outstanding Advocate Leadership at UIS

The University of Illinois Foundation today announces long-time Springfield resident David Farrell as the recipient of the 2018 William E. Winter Award for Outstanding Advocate Leadership.

The award will be presented at the UIS Celebration of Philanthropy on Wednesday, April 25 at UIS. The U of I Foundation is the fundraising arm of the University of Illinois.

Farrell’s career in state government was capped by 20 years as Director of Public Affairs for the Illinois Commerce Commission. During his career and since retirement in 2002, he has been a tireless advocate for NPR Illinois/WUIS, frequently taking part in on-air fundraising. His deep voice adds sincerity and gravitas to every appeal he makes.

“I’m happy to do it,” he said, “because there’s nothing like NPR Illinois. It appeals on so many levels of the mind and emotion.”

He has also contributed to NPR Illinois as a member of the Citizen Advisory Board and was instrumental in helping to start the station’s Health and Harvest Desk. Springfield can also thank him for “Fresh Air”, a popular program which years ago he helped to bring to the station.

Farrell, who has a deep interest in fairness, also contributes his marketing and communications expertise to the UIS Illinois Innocence Project (IIP), and has served as emcee at the annual Defenders of the Innocent Reception. He and his wife Laurie, who shares in Farrell’s advocacy, have also initiated, underwritten and helped plan IIP events.

“The Illinois Innocence Project is a way to make the entire justice system stronger,” according to Farrell. “This work strengthens the entire society.”

Farrell’s advocacy at UIS also includes Central Illinois Nonprofit Resource Center, the Theatre program and the UIS Cares Food Pantry.

The William E. Winter Award, named for the late CEO Emeritus of the 7-Up Company and a longtime member of the University of Illinois Foundation Board of Directors, celebrates individuals who play active roles in securing private support for the University of Illinois.

Past UIS recipients of the William E. Winter Award include Paul O’Shea, W. Robert Felker, Pamela McClelland, Cullom Davis, Bob Clary, Leonard Branson, Thom Serafin, Tom Marantz, Julie Kellner, Guerry Suggs and Michelle Suggs (deceased); Howard Humphrey (deceased), James Lundquist (deceased), and Clifford Greenwalt.

For more information, contact Jeff Lorber, UIS vice chancellor for advancement, at 217/206-6058 or email jlorber@uis.edu.

Thursday, April 19, 2018

UIS faculty members publish “Living Out Loud”, a new textbook in LGBTQ+ studies

University of Illinois Springfield faculty members Michael Murphy, associate professor of gender and sexuality, and Brytton Bjorngaard, assistant professor of digital media, have published a new textbook entitled “Living Out Loud: An Introduction to LGBTQ History, Society, and Culture”.

Murphy severed as the overall editor for the book, authoring two chapters, while Brytton produced all original figures and illustrations, and oversaw the image permissions process.

According to the book’s publisher, “Living Out Loud” is the first narrative textbook designed to support college-level “Introduction to LGBTQ Studies” (and similar) courses. Students enrolled in such courses are typically sophomores and juniors, with a range of motivations, interest levels, educational preparation, and academic majors. They may identify (or be on the way to identifying) as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer/questioning, intersex or other types of gender and sexual minorities (LGBTQ+). Or they may have LGBTQ+ friends or family members who they wish to better support through learning more about their lives, experiences, issues, and accomplishments.

“The goal of ‘Living Out Loud’ is to introduce students to the exciting field of LGBTQ Studies and provide a broad, multidisciplinary foundation for subsequent, more-advanced academic work,” said Murphy.

Unlike many text readers or collections of conference papers in this subject area, which can employ advanced concepts and vocabularies, “Living Out Loud” offers an accessible, student-friendly text with content, tone, language, and design that is appropriate for lower- and mid-level college and university students. It introduces students to foundational topics, concepts, terms, and debates in the rapidly expanding field of interdisciplinary LGBTQ+ Studies.

The book is divided into nine chapters, each focused on a discrete disciplinary or interdisciplinary area of academic study. Care has been taken to include entire chapters or chapter sections from the humanities, sciences, and social sciences. The book is unique in its inclusion of chapters on LGBTQ+ Sexual Behavior & Sexual Health; Literature & Visual Arts; Education; Relationships; and, Globalization. Chapter authors have been mindful to address LGBTQ+ racial and ethnic diversity, and better integrate bisexual and transgender people, topics, experiences, and themes.

Murphy has been a faculty member at UIS since 2009. He holds a master’s degree and doctorate in art history and archaeology (with a graduate certificate in women, gender, and sexuality studies) from Washington University in St. Louis.

Bjorngaard has been a faculty member at UIS since 2013. She holds a bachelor’s degree in graphic design from Saint Mary’s University of Minnesota and a master of fine arts degree in graphic design from Iowa State University.

The textbook was published by Routledge and is available for purchase on the publisher’s website at www.routledge.com and from other popular stores and websites including Amazon.com and Barnes & Noble. Reviewer copies may also be ordered on the publisher’s website.

For more information about the book, contact Murphy at 217/206-8510 or mmurp4@uis.edu or Bjorngaard at 217/206-7547 or bbjor2@uis.edu.

Tuesday, April 17, 2018

Leadership lived: UIS senior helps raise thousands of dollars for children fighting illnesses at a local hospital


Hannah Warden has a passion for helping children who are fighting illnesses at HSHS St. John’s Hospital in Springfield. The senior University of Illinois Springfield business administration major recently helped to organize a Dance Marathon fundraiser on campus that raised more than $9,000 for the Children’s Miracle Network.

“I’ve met a lot of the kids. I personally know them and they’ve had an impact on my life,” she said. “There are some kids who have spent days, weeks, and years in the hospital, so anything I can do to give back to them is amazing and it brings a lot of joy to my life.”

Before the Dance Marathon, students spent a year raising funds and awareness for the children’s hospital. The Dance Marathon event was the culmination of that efforts where students got a chance to meet patients and families treated at St. John’s.

“I actually interned with the Children’s Miracle Network this summer, so I kind of started (planning the Dance Marathon) this summer,” said Warden. “I went to a conference in Maryland and we’ve have meetings once a week this school year.”

Outside her role as director of the UIS Dance Marathon, Warden is also involved on campus as a summer orientation leader for the UIS Office of New Student Orientation and Parent Relations. For the past two summers she’s helped to welcome incoming students to campus.

Warden is also a facilitator for the UIS Campus Recreation Challenge Course where she brings teams of students in and teaches them leadership skills through different physical activities.

“I’ve gotten involved,” she said. “If you don’t get involved it’s hard to enjoy college, honestly, but for me I came here, I got involved right away, held quite a few jobs here on campus, been a part of quite a few organizations, so I love that.”

Warden transferred to UIS from a private university at the beginning of her sophomore year. She feels that she made the right decision in coming to UIS.

“My brother came here and he really loved it here. He had tons of friends and enjoyed his four years, so I thought it would be an awesome school. Once I came here, I absolutely loved it,” she said.

Following graduation from UIS, Warden plans to start a career the healthcare field. She leaves UIS knowing she’s grown as a leader and a person.

“You’re not just coming here for school, but you can really come here to figure out who you want to be and get involved in tons of different things,” she said. “For me, I think UIS has really changed me.”

Friday, April 13, 2018

Leadership lived: Transfer student finds her voice through leadership roles at UIS

Before transferring to the University of Illinois Springfield, Molly Looby says she felt “lost” and “very small”. However, she’s now found her voice as a student worker for the UIS Women’s Center and president of the UIS College Democrats.

Looby, a communication and political science double major, recently helped to plan Chancellor’s Women’s Leadership Luncheon, which featured five accomplished women from the Springfield community who spoke about their success.

“Even today, it’s really hard to be a woman and a leader,” she said. “There’s a lot of obstacles in the way, so I think it’s very important to ask questions and learn about what we can do.”

As the president of UIS College Democrats, she often helps bring candidates to campus who are running for political office, so they have an opportunity to speak with students.

“I think it’s really important because they need to hear from students, they need to realize that students have a voice and we have things to say and we have something that we want from them and they need to listen,” she said.

Looby says she feels she made the right decision in choosing UIS and feels fortunate for all of the opportunities she’s had on campus.

“I have no idea how it happened, I was given so many opportunities,” she said. “I never thought that any of this would happen.”

Looby, who grew up in Springfield, says she “loves it here” at UIS. She enjoys the community, the diverse people and the diverse opinions on campus.

“I think that there’s a lot of passion for such a small place,” she said. “If you want the small class size, but you want to have a loud voice on campus, I think that this place is absolutely for you.”

Following graduation from UIS, Looby plans to work as an organizer for a labor union.

Thursday, April 12, 2018

James Koeppe wins the 2018 Chancellor’s Academic Professional Excellence Award

James Koeppe, director of campus recreation at the University of Illinois Springfield, is the winner of the 15th annual Chancellor’s Academic Professional Excellence (CAPE) Award. The award was presented by Chancellor Susan J. Koch on April 12, 2018.

Koeppe was instrumental in starting the new UIS Rising Stars Program for new university employees. Thanks to his leadership, the inaugural group of 15 new employees, from 11 different campus departments, had the opportunity to learn more about the history of UIS, tour campus housing, engage in professional development and community service, attend UIS sporting events and visit with leaders from the City of Springfield.

“His vision and efforts to create a new employee orientation program that went beyond the existing new hire onboarding practices, was a work project that went outside of his role as Director of Campus Recreation,” said a nominator. “The goal of this new program is to build a stronger sense of campus community, improve employee retention, encourage a collaborative environment, and exemplify Leadership lived among our newest campus employees.”

Koeppe was instrumental in all aspects of staring the program, including coming up with the vision, seeking support from university administrators and finding funding.

“Personally knowing the efforts it took James to get this initiative off the ground, reflects James’ contribution, not only to his unit and his own development, but his great contribution to UIS as a whole,” said a nominator.

Koeppe has also been responsible for significant innovation within the Department of Campus Recreation. He created Rec-a-Palooza, a day-long event that showcased Campus Recreation. The day ended with a street party featuring food trucks, a band and recreation events, which attracted 650 students, making it the largest single student event in recent UIS history.

He has also led renovations to Rec Park, which include the addition of new field lighting, an improved sand volleyball court and a new miniature golf course, in addition to working to improve professional development for student employees. He is involved in the National Intramural and Recreational Sports Association and the Illinois Campus Recreation Conference.

On campus, Koeppe also serves as the advisor for the Phi Kappa Tau fraternity, the largest fraternity on campus with importance placed on community service. He served as acting UIS dean of students from August 2015-February 2016.

Off campus, he has volunteered with the American Lung Association Fight for Air Climb, served as the chair for the Cubs Scouts Pinewood Derby and is a founding board member for 100+ Who Care in Springfield, which raised $7,000 for Compass for Kids in one evening.

The CAPE Award recognizes U of I academic professionals for their efforts in three general categories: work projects, professional development and affiliations, and contributions to their units. The winner receives $500 in cash for personal use.

All academic professionals are eligible to receive the CAPE Award; nominations are reviewed by campus committees and candidates’ names are forwarded to the chancellor, who makes the final selections.

 Others nominated for the 2018 CAPE Award include Raymond Barnett, Sean Crawford, Valerie Gebhardt, Karen Guthrie, Kathryn Kleeman, Kara McElwrath, Lisa McGuire, Mae Noll, Joy Thibadeau, Melanie Trimm and Tom Wood.

Friday, April 06, 2018

UIS students win the outstanding delegation award at the international Model United Nations simulation

A group of University of Illinois Springfield students won the outstanding delegation award during the international Model United Nations simulation held March 26-30, 2018, in New York City. This is the second year in a row that UIS students have won the award.

Model United Nations is a conference that simulates an actual United Nations meeting. The UIS delegation consisted of 18 students and one faculty member. Hundreds of international colleges and universities competed during the event.

Three UIS students were also honored with individual awards. Munashe Ariwamwari of Naperville won the best delegate award for his committee, while Rosie Dawoud of Bolingbrook and Heba Qazi of Bartlett won the best position paper award for the paper they wrote together. This is the first time in UIS history that students received awards in all three categories.

Students worked for close to two semesters learning about their assigned country, drafting resolutions, working on diplomacy and consensus building, and writing position papers on specific issues. This year, UIS represented the country of Zimbabwe, which is located in Africa.

Other UIS students who participated in this year’s simulation include Head Delegate Erik Motyll of New Lenox, Brandon Kuhl of Springfield, Beto Flores of Waukegan, Halie Edwards of Joliet, Chloe Compton of Troy, Edwin Robles of Cicero, Maame Aggrey of Elgin, Gavin Hunt of Peoria, Crystal Terrazas of Berwyn, Briana Rodriguez of Hoffman Estates, Brandon Klages of Algonquin, Luke D'Elia of Springfield, Paul Cunningham of Homer, Conor McKenzie of Lindenhurst and Payton Raso of Iowa City, Iowa.

UIS students were advised by Ali Nizamuddin, UIS associate professor of political science, who accompanied students on the trip. For more information on the Model United Nations awards, contact Nizamuddin at 217/206-8424 or aniza2@uis.edu.

Thursday, April 05, 2018

UIS professor to study “Art & Public Culture in Chicago” during National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) Summer Seminar

UIS Associate Professor Hinda Seif with students presenting at the Student Technology, Arts & Research Symposium on April 5, 2018.
Hinda Seif, University of Illinois Springfield associate professor and chair of the Department of Women and Gender Studies, was recently selected for a National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) Summer Seminar on “Art & Public Culture in Chicago”.

The session will be held June 11-29, 2018, at the Newberry Library in Chicago. Seif was selected from more than 100 applicants and will spend three weeks learning about the arts, their reception, and their civic importance in Chicago from the 1893 World’s Fair through the present moment.

"This institute is related to my current research on women artists, spaces and self-expression in Mexican Chicago,” said Seif. “Given that we have many students at UIS who are from or are interested in Chicago, I plan to bring what I learn back to UIS and central Illinois to enhance my teaching and research."

According to the seminar description, the course will be particularly focused on artistic communities, small-scale venues, and vernacular expressions that developed against or alongside Chicago’s mainstream cultural institutions—especially those that took shape in the city’s African American neighborhoods.

The summer seminar will be led by Liesl Olson, director of Chicago Studies at the Newberry Library; Rebecca Zorach, professor of art history at Northwestern University; and Chad Heap, associate professor of American studies at George Washington University.

Last summer, Seif was selected to participate in an NEH Summer Seminar exploring 20th century U.S. history through the lens of the National Women’s Conference, which was held in Houston in 1977.

Seif holds a master’s degree in women’s studies from the University of Arizona and a Ph.D. in cultural anthropology from the University of California, Davis.

UIS students finish in first place at a national Society for Advancement of Management competition

A group of four University of Illinois Springfield students, who are members of the Society for Advancement of Management (SAM) student chapter at UIS, finished in first place at the Thomas Greensmith Open Division Collegiate Management Case Competition held on March 23, 2018, in Arlington, Virginia.

During the national competition, UIS students competed against 22 other colleges and universities. UIS students presented solutions related to a business case involving Ryder, a fortune 500 company. Students analyzed some specific problems Ryder is currently facing (more specifically “low wages” and “demand for more drivers”) and presented short and long-term recommendations to solve these problems for the company.

“This award is special in so many ways, it's the first time UIS participated, and with our presentation and hard work, we were confident of winning something at the competition,” said Prashant Bidhuri, a UIS student on the team. “Our team had never worked together before and as much fun winning the competition was, getting to know the other members of the team and becoming great friends with them was an unforgettable experience.”

UIS students Prashant Bidhuri, a graduate Management Information Systems (MIS) major from New Delhi, India; Apoorva Kanthwal a graduate MIS major from Shimla, Himachal Pradesh, India; Michael Kirchgesner, an undergraduate business administration major from Springfield, Illinois; and Adella Nguyen, a graduate MBA student from Ho Chi Minh, Vietnam made up the team. The team was advised by Sundeep Sharma, Ph.D., UIS assistant professor of management.

“Winning this award shows that teamwork and working together pays off,” said student Michael Kirchgesner. “Each group member contributed in their own way to make this one of the best presentation experiences available for college students. This award has motivated me to work at my best level until my good becomes my better, and my better becomes my best.”

For more information on the Society for Advancement of Management student competitions, contact Assistant Professor Sudeep Sharma at 217/206-8275 or sshar5@uis.edu.

Monday, April 02, 2018

Leadership lived: Student sees the impact of volunteering during Alternative Spring Break trip to Texas

University of Illinois Springfield junior liberal studies major Madison Reuss has a passion for volunteering. She recently went on a week-long Alternative Spring Break trip to Texas where she and 20 other students helped clean up the damage left by Hurricane Harvey.

The group helped homeowners pack up their houses, spread sand, tore down a shed and sorted supplies at the Salvation Army. Reuss says her favorite part of the trip was hearing from homeowners and knowing they were making a difference.

“One homeowner was getting ready to finish gutting his house and redo it and the one thing he said was just seeing headlights in the driveway coming to help always gave him hope and especially a time like Hurricane Harvey, they lose hope, and seeing the headlights just gave him that hope again.”

The group traveled to Beaumont, Texas where they partnered with Community Collaborations International (CCI). Reuss and the other students on the trip stayed at a church in Beaumont while they volunteer.

“Because of the trip, I’ve been able to make connections and friendships with people that I never thought I’d make friendships with,” she said.

At UIS, Reuss is the volunteer chair and a member of the Legion of Ladies and works at the Volunteer and Civic Engagement Center where she helps to coordinate a weekly volunteer effort with Lee Elementary School in Springfield. She also works as a music assistant for the UIS Music Department.

Off campus, Reuss is the president of the Springfield Celts Women’s Rugby team. She discovered the community team at the UIS Involvement Expo and decided to give it a try. She’d never played rugby before joining, but has come to love the sport.

“We’re not just a college team, we’re a local team, so you do make the connections in the community, which helps make the bonds from the community even greater,” she said. Especially for me, it’s really empowering as a woman.”

Following graduation from UIS, the Nashville, Illinois native, would like to become a secondary education teacher teaching 9 through 12 grade students.

“I’m absolutely thrilled that I came to UIS,” she said. “It was a really good step for me. Getting here and going to school here I’ve had opportunities that I never imagined that I would have.”

UIS Education Honor Society inducts eight new members

The Alpha Alpha Gamma chapter of Kappa Delta Pi, the International Honor Society in Education, at the University of Illinois Springfield inducted eight new members during a ceremony on March 25, 2018.

Dustin Day, superintendent and high school principal of Waverly Community Unit School District #6, was the guest speaker at the event.

The Society inducts individuals who have exhibited the ideals of scholarship, integrity in service, and commitment to excellence in teaching and its allied professions. Selection as a member of Kappa Delta Pi is based on high academic achievement, a commitment to education as a career, and a professional attitude that assures steady growth in the profession.

Students inducted at this year’s ceremony include: Joshua Atwood, Taylor Bauer, Lauren Capranica, Brianna Graham, Naylin Ronchetto, Jennifer Ruggless, Ashley Trader and Cassidy Yates.

Kappa Delta Pi was established in 1911 to recognize and promote excellence in education. Through its programs, services, and strategic partnerships, the honor society supports the professional growth and teaching practices of educators throughout all phases and levels of their careers. The organization currently has more than 600 chapters and an active membership of nearly 40,000 worldwide.

For more information, contact Ronda Mitchell, chapter advisor and UIS assistant professor of Teacher Education, at 217/206-7008 or rmitche@uis.edu.

Friday, March 30, 2018

Kelsea Gurski selected as new UIS associate chancellor for public affairs

The University of Illinois Springfield has selected Kelsea Gurski as the new associate chancellor for public affairs. She will also serve as chief of staff for UIS Chancellor Susan J. Koch.

Gurski has more than  15 years of experience as a communications and marketing professional. She comes from the Illinois Department of Transportation (IDOT) as the Bureau Chief of Communication Services. Prior to IDOT, she was the system director of Public Relations and Communications at Memorial Health System and was the Voice Editor and a features reporter at The State Journal-Register.

Her responsibilities will include managing key issues and representing the chancellor at various internal and external constituencies as well as leading the communications team and supervising the UIS Police Department.

“I am thrilled for this opportunity to serve under Chancellor Koch’s leadership and become part of the UIS community,” said Gurski. “It is a very exciting time to join the Springfield campus, and look forward to contributing to the bright future UIS is creating for all who benefit from this educational treasure.”

Gurski earned a bachelor’s degree in communication from Bradley University in 2002 and a master’s degree in communication from UIS in 2008.

Thursday, March 29, 2018

Leadership lived: Student helps to shape the future of Greek Life at UIS


Colleen McMahon came to the University of Illinois Springfield as a freshman with no plans of joining a Greek Life organization. However, that all changed when she and fifteen friends founded the Gamma Phi Omega International Sorority, Inc. Captivating Chi Chapter.

“I love Gamma Phi Omega because it’s the support network that I didn’t necessarily think I needed at first,” she said. “It wasn’t something that I saw myself being a part of, but once I got interested and became a member, I realized it was a network beyond my undergraduate career.”

Now a senior business administration and communication major, McMahon is president of Gamma Phi Omega’s Chi Chapter and is helping to shape the future of Greek Life at UIS as the president of the UIS Greek Life Council.

“As the president of the Greek Life Council, I’m in charge of making sure that the different Greek organizations here work together and they get along and they follow the rules that the university has set for Greek Life,” she said.

McMahon also plays a role in advising the university about the expansion of Greek Life on campus. She recently led a talk on the “Dos and Don’ts of Greek Life” where she advised prospective groups of students who wanted to start their own Greek organization.

“We wanted to make sure they understood what goes into being a member of Greek Life on this campus and what it’s like to be member of a Greek Organization in general,” she said.

As a founding member of the UIS Gamma Phi Omega Chapter, McMahon knows how much work it takes to start a new sorority or fraternity chapter.

“My role as a founder was to really bring together our sisters and to get this organization ready for when we would start recruiting other people,” she said. “We had to create governing documents, create events and the things that would create a legacy that other people would want to be a part of in the future.”

McMahon, a native of Flora, Illinois, is also a peer mentor for the Capital Scholars Honors Program on campus, a member of the Beta Gamma Sigma National Business Honor Society and the Organization of Latin American Students at UIS.

Following graduation from UIS, McMahon plans to earn a master’s degree in multicultural communication and later hopes to work in higher education. She says she’s learned many lessons about leadership during her time at UIS.

“At UIS, I’ve had all these experiences in leadership and I’ve grown as an individual in ways that I never would have guessed before I came to college,” she said.

Monday, March 19, 2018

Leadership lived: UIS baseball player Michael Rothmund enjoys breaking records and mentoring teammates

 
Michael Rothmund grew up playing baseball and watching the Chicago Cubs on television while dreaming of playing on the collegiate level or even professionally. He’s off to a good start as the first baseman for the University of Illinois Springfield Prairie Stars baseball team.

During the 2017 season, Rothmund set several UIS and NCAA records for homeruns. He led the entire NCAA (Division I, II and II) in home runs at 24 and broke the Division II single season homerun record averaging almost one home run per every two games played. He was also named the UIS Athletics Male Athlete of the Year and 1st-Team All-Great Lakes Valley Conference.

As a senior, Rothmund is considered an unofficial leader on the UIS baseball team. He enjoys mentoring the younger players and helping them to improve their game.

“Kids go to you and they look to you for answers and if they’re having a hard time on the field, struggling with hitting or fielding, they go to you,” he said. “It makes a real impact on my life knowing that I mean that much to some of the kids on the team.”

Rothmund, who grew up in Lombard, Illinois, is a communication major at UIS. He says he chose UIS because of the excellent baseball coaching staff and because he wanted to earn a University of Illinois degree.

“People say they want to go to big colleges and stuff like that,” he said. “That’s not my kind of style. I like getting to know my professors and getting to know my teammates and classmates and everything and having that personal connection with them.”

Rothmund is currently gaining professional experience by interning with Nicole Hager, who is the director of academic support services for UIS Athletics. As part of the internship, he helps with important paperwork and is planning a social media campaign to keep other student-athletes informed about important deadlines and resources available to them.

Following graduation from UIS, Rothmund says he’s considering a career in real estate or broadcasting. However, he’s hoping he can continue to play baseball.

“If there’s any chance I can keep playing baseball, I’m going to keep doing it. It’s been my goal since I was four or five years old and saw Major League Baseball players on TV and I just wanted to be that.”

Rothmund says he’ll look back on his college experience with fond memories and confidence that he made the right choice by attending the University of Illinois Springfield.

“It’s been fantastic. I wouldn’t have wanted to be anywhere else,” he said.

Thursday, March 15, 2018

Leadership lived: UIS sophomore gives back by mentoring the next generation of leaders

 
Aaron Boyd came to the University of Illinois Springfield knowing he wanted to give back to his community. The sophomore is majoring in criminology and criminal justice at UIS and plans to become a police officer following graduation.

Boyd, who grew up on the South Side of Chicago, is the vice president of the UIS Black Male Collegiate Society, historian for the Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc. Upsilon Xi Chapter, a student orientation coordinator for the UIS Office of New Student Orientation and Parent Relations and an intramural referee for UIS Campus Recreation.

As part of the Black Male Collegiate Society, Boyd mentors a second grade student at Springfield Public School’s Matheny-Withrow Elementary every other Friday through the Big Brothers Big Sisters Program.

“We talk with the boys and see how they’re doing and check on their grades and things like that,” he said. “It’s just important to give back. It’s a good feeling. It’s a good feeling seeing the smiles on kids’ faces when we come in and how they enjoy spending time with us.”

Boyd was recently picked to ask candidates a question about the environment during a UIS debate featuring Democratic candidates running in the primary race for Illinois governor.

“It was kind of nerve-racking. I was in front of a lot of important people. I was on TV,” he said, adding that the debate has given him a new interest in politics.

Boyd says he chose UIS because he had a brother who also attended the university.

“I came down here for a visit and people treated me with respect and treated my kindly, so I decided to look more into it and came down here and fell in love with the campus,” he said.

Boyd says he chose criminology and criminal justice as his major because he wants to continue to make a difference in his community as a state or local police officer.

“I just want to be there in my community, policing my own community, rather than letting somebody else police my community,” he said.

As a sophomore, Boyd has two more years at UIS before he graduates. In that time, he plans to accomplish even more and leave his mark on the university.

“I feel like when I graduate I will have made my name at UIS,” he said. “I hope to bring in the next generation of black males and help them make their names, just as I want to and have already.”